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Partners

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Casey Chisick Casey Chisick
t: 416 869 5403
Email Casey Chisick email
Leonard Glickman Leonard Glickman
t: 416 869 5993
Email Leonard Glickman email
Alison Hayman Alison Hayman
t: 416 815 4240
Email Alison Hayman email

Communications

We provide regulatory and transactional advice related to broadcasting, copyright and telecommunications. We regularly appear on behalf of clients in proceedings before the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) and the Copyright Board. Our communications law specialists work closely with other members of the Advertising & Marketing, Entertainment, Information Technology, and Intellectual Property Groups, as well as with our Securities Law, Commercial Litigation and Business Law Groups, just to name a few.

We represent a wide range of clients, including:

  • Broadcasters (e.g., radio, television)
  • Broadcasting distribution undertakings (e.g., cable, satellite)
  • Content owners and producers
  • Performers
  • Telecommunications carriers and resellers

We offer advice to corporations and individuals in relation to the following communications law matters:

  • Canadian ownership issues - broadcasting and telecommunications
  • Broadcasting - entering the Canadian market
  • Broadcasting - obtaining licences from the CRTC
  • Copyright - filing and prosecuting tariffs before the Copyright Board
  • Internet domain names - disputes and transfers
  • New media - content licensing
  • Telecommunications - competition, licensing, and registration matters 

Representative Transactions

Ownership

Many US-based and other non-Canadian clients require advice on Canadian ownership requirements under the Broadcasting Act and Telecommunications Act. These matters may arise in the context of filing a prospectus or preparing licence applications.

Broadcasting Act Policy

On an ongoing basis, the group's members represent various clients' policy reviews conducted by the CRTC related to matters such as access issues, commercial radio, the CRTC's exemption order policies, and its policies for Canadian television.

Broadcasting Licensing

We represent broadcaster clients in CRTC licence applications: radio; television broadcasting and specialty television. We provide strategic advice on business planning; assist in the preparation of licence applications and other submissions to the CRTC; and participate in clients' appearances at CRTC public hearings.

Telecommunications Competition

Since competition has been introduced into the Canadian telecommunications environments for long-distance and local services, we have been called upon to advise equipment producers, telecommunications carriers, and resellers with respect to the introduction of competition under the Telecommunications Act.

Telecommunications Policy - Rights of Way

Along with members of the firm's municipal law group, we advise telecommunications companies, land developers and municipalities with respect to the CRTC's policies and requirements related to support structures and rights of way.

Copyright Act Tariffs

We have represented the Neighbouring Rights Collective of Canada ("NRCC") with respect to their tariffs, filed with the Copyright Board of Canada, and intervened on NRCC's behalf during proceedings related to the Copyright Board's review of tariffs filed by other collective societies.

Internet/New Media

We represented a major New Media industry group, the Interactive Multimedia Arts and Technology Association ("IMAT") during the CRTC's 1998-1999 New Media proceeding. This proceeding resulted in the important decision by the CRTC to refrain from regulating broadcasting on the Internet.

Internet Liability

We advised Internet Service Providers ("ISPs") and others on the implications of the Copyright Board's October 1999 decision regarding the potential liability of ISPs for the communication of works to the public via the Internet.

Web-Casting

We provide advice to broadcasters and others in relation to the "web-casting" of signals over the Internet. This requires an understanding of issues related to the Broadcasting Act, the CRTC's New Media exemption order, the Radiocommunication Act, the Trade-marks Act and the Copyright Act.